„Chicago Tribune” opublikuje list Konsul Generalnej RP ws. poprawności historycznej i nazewnictwa niemieckich obozów śmierci w okupowanej Polsce

Chicago Tribune opublikuje list Konsul Generalnej RP ws. poprawności historycznej i nazewnictwa niemieckich obozów śmierci w okupowanej Polsce

Paulina Kapuścińska, konsul generalna RP w Chicago fot. chicago.msz.gov.pl

Paulina Kapuścińska, konsul generalna RP w Chicago fot. chicago.msz.gov.pl

Po apelach Konsul Generalnej RP w Chicago Pauliny Kapuścińskiej, redakcja Chicago Tribune opublikuje list konsul Kapuścińskiej o poprawności historycznej i właściwym nazewnictwie niemieckich obozów śmierci w okupowanej Polsce.

Konsulat Generalna RP w Chicago wyraża zadowolenie z faktu uznania przez redakcję Chicago Tribune argumentacji Konsulatu dotyczącej precyzyjnego nazewnictwa niemieckich obozów śmierci w okupowanej Polsce. Poniżej prezentujemy oryginalną wersję listu Konsul Generalnej przesłanego 16 lipca do publikacji w Chicago Tribune. List został opublikowany w czwartek, 18 lipca 2013 r.

Konsulat Generalny RP w Chicago docenia zaangażowanie licznych przedstawicieli społeczności polonijnej, którzy zdecydowali się wesprzeć Konsulat swoimi apelami przesyłanymi do redakcji gazety w tej sprawie.

Dear Chicago Tribune Editor,

Thank you for your interesting story from June 9 about WWII and Holocaust survivors in Chicago.

As Consul General of the Republic of Poland, but also as a Polish citizen, I am pleased that Tribune editors agreed to publish my letter and I hope it adds another viewpoint to the topic.

Your publication stirred the Polish community of Chicago as it contained a grave omission: the German death camps in occupied-Poland were misnamed as “Nazi camps in Poland”, which distorts the historical picture because Poland was non-existent on the map of WWII Europe after being invaded, destroyed and decimated by the two then-allied powers: Nazi Germany and Soviet Russia.

For readers without a thorough historical knowledge „Nazi camps in Poland” might suggest Poland’s involvement in Germany’s atrocities. Let’s not forget: it was Germany’s occupation of Poland that led to Hitler’s decision to locate the German death camps on occupied Polish soil and Poles were the first inmates of these camps. Unlike many, Poland was never an ally of Germany and never had a collaborative regime. Poland lost 6 million of its citizens in Hitler’s atrocities, among them 3 million Polish-Jews and 3 million non-Jewish Poles.

In its widely-used media stylebook, the Associated Press urges journalists and others to use correct names of the German death camps in occupied Poland. So does UNESCO. Respectfully, why don’t we join them, or Germans themselves, in calling the death camps by their proper name? These were German death camps in occupied Poland. “Nazi” is needlessly euphemistic and hardly synonymous. I am saying these words as a representative of the Republic of Poland, a country whose 3 million descendants call Chicago and Midwest home. They know full well that each and every publication of “Nazi camps in Poland” or its derivatives hurts their feelings and estranges your readers.

Paulina Kapuścińska

Consul General of the Republic of Poland in Chicago

Źródło:

Konsulat RP, Chicago

Categories: Polonia

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